“Feelin’ 22”

I still can’t believe I turned 22 yesterday… can someone please tell me whats so special about 22? I’m just another year older now. Another year I am suppose to be smarter, wiser and more mature and I’m not sure if any of that was accomplished. I may have gotten a tad smarter… but who knows.. i think the only reason I’m doing as well as I am in school right now is because I love the school I attend, and I feel like classes are easier and the teachers help an ass ton more than anywhere else I’ve been idk.
But really, I’m 22… it took me half a year last year to even feel like I was 21. I didn’t really do anything differently because.. well I had on good as fake from ID Chief.
I’m starting to really feel better, my thoughts aren’t jumbled like they have been all break. So even though I haven’t been able to voice them exactly to my friends at least I am able to put something on here for myself. I don’t think anyone even reads these anyway so that’s perfect.
Paalam na para sa ngayon

Excitment

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I’m surprisingly super excited for spring semester to start on Monday. I’m ready to get back into routine instead of spending money I don’t have, watching countless hours of Netflix, and laying in bed all day.

I’m ready for the struggle of waking up in the morning, dragging to Starbucks on the days I actually wake up on time and going to Dunkin Donuts on the days I’m running late. I’m ready to live in the library again and complain about the unnecessary work that the teachers assign.
It sounds crazy to say I’m excited for all the negative things that go along with school but like every thing else in the world, this break as taught me a lot. I’m glad I took advantage of this Winter Break to focus on myself. I feel like I have a new head on my shoulders and a different outlook on a lot of things. I just hope I can keep it this way.

I’m even more ecstatic for Sunday, January 12!! Charleston Southern University is holding a meeting for all girls interested to start the Alpha Delta Pi sorority !! It’s just an informational meeting and I hope there are enough girls interested and qualified for us to be able to start and become founders of ADPi at CSU!!! I’m too excited to be a part of this amazing sisterhood, and meet some amazing girls. I already know a few girls that are interested that I have become close with this past semester and I can’t even put into words the happiness the thought of all this brings me. Especially because of the school I attend… being surrounded by people who constantly push you forward and help you seek God in the most amazing ways is breath taking.

The more and more I think about everything the more excited I become. And I get to see my amazing choir !!! I love my ensemble to death and I can’t wait to see the new girls that are joining this semester. We work so hard and the girls are all unique and beautiful in their own way.
This year will be great I just know it….fingers crossed

Discombabulated

I’ve been feeling really off lately, and I feel bad that I’ve been so distant with all my friends. I’m really not doing it on purpose but for some reason I feel like this break, I just need time to myself. Time to just focus on me with out any input from anyone. Ive been going to yoga once a week again and thats been helping me a lot in so many ways… from my mind, my body and my soul. It gives me an hour and a half to myself where my inner peace is at rest.

 I just wish I was able to tell my friends how I feel exactly, I haven’t posted on here or tumblr in a while because I simply haven’t been able to put into words whats going on with me or how I even feel.

So any down time I’ve had this break I’ve been trying to become closer with my family. I have found this app called Viber that allows me to text my family in the Philippines whenever I want. And finding that app was probably the best Christmas present I’ve ever received.

My dad got my mom and I a wii for Christmas for us to dance and workout with so my mom and I have been doing that a lot. We’ve never really gotten along but I’m really making an effort now.

I’m turning 22 this coming Wednesday… I don’t even want to think about it. What’s so special about 22?? NOTHING. The only things I’m worried about is whats all going to happen next semester.

My love life seems to be slowly but surely working back up again… but thats the least from my worries now. Next semester will be the death of me. I’ve been working up my resumé to the crisp, for I am finally eligible for the internships I want to apply for. I have signed up for 7 classes with a schedule ending at 5:30. My goal is to graduate by December of 2014 so I guess I have to do what I have to. 
So I guess there really isn’t much else to say before I end up in a panic attack thinking about it all, and thats just the school side of my thoughts. 

Thank God tomorrows Sunday. Meaning Church in the morning and yoga in the afternoon.
The Day of Rest.

Women

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“Girls and women of the world, could we stop apologizing for wanting and eating food? Because this is one of the most ridiculous things that we do collectively as lady-people, and not only does it annoy the shit out of me personally, but it is also INCREDIBLY SAD. Could we stop feeling “guilty” for wanting an effing brownie? Or a plate of fries? Could we stop actively seeking permission from our friends to go ahead and “be bad” and order the cheesecake? Could we all just go ahead and order whatever it is that we feel like eating, instead of saying, “Oh, I feel like a pig, you guys are just getting salads”?
Because—now I know this will come as a shock—WOMEN EAT. We get hungry. We get hungry for pizzas and Double Stuff Oreos and nachos and ice cream and giant French-toast breakfasts, and you know what? WE DON’T NEED TO FEEL BAD ABOUT THAT.
Here I am making a vast and sweeping gender stereotype, but do you ever, ever hear dudes say “I just want a little bite” or “This is so bad, you guys, but I totally ate a whole pint of Ben & Jerry’s last night”? No! Because it’s OK for men to eat! Men get hongray! Men need frozen dinners called “Hungry-Man”! Men need Manwich! Boys are allowed to grow into men, but “attractive” women in our culture are expected to stay at pretty much an eternal pre-adolescent weight. What’s society’s current ideal man look like? Fit. Big muscles. What’s society’s current ideal woman look like? Thin. Really thin. No hips. No belly. Hairless except for the head. Basically a 10-year-old girl with boobs added for sex appeal.
You see it everywhere—every café, every restaurant, every kitchen across the country. Women bargaining with waiters and friends about whether or not they should get a side salad or fries with their entrée. Women making demeaning jokes to one another about their desire for food, like “Once on the lips, forever on the hips” and “Well, it’s midnight, so technically your body doesn’t know whether it’s today or tomorrow, so the calories zero themselves out, hahaha” and women bonding with one another over their shared guilt! You’re being bad and getting the chocolate cake? Ooh, now that you’re doing it, let’s both be really bad, and I’ll order the key lime pie and we won’t tell a soul, will we? It’s just us girls!
Why are we apologizing for wanting food? What the hell? BODIES NEED FOOD. WE DIE WITHOUT IT. Food tastes good! And we’re programmed to crave it! Sure, some food is healthier than other food, but what is up with punishing ourselves for wanting pickle chips? Why is it acceptable—nay! encouraged!—in our culture for women to feel guilty and publicly “admit” our guilt for wanting to eat a cookie? Why are we rationalizing our “bad behavior”—you know, our EATING—with statements like “I’ve been really good lately” or “I’m gonna need to walk this off later”?
It makes me insane.
I want this to end.
I want women to allow themselves to want food. I want women to be hungry and ask for what they want to eat without apologizing. I want women to stop looking for permission from others before they eat something that is not a carrot or spinach. I want my friends to get the chili fries if they want the chili fries, and not say something like, “It all goes straight to my ____” (hips, thighs, butt, etc.). I want to see a girl sink her teeth into a huge cheeseburger and fries and not cut the burger in half to save some for later. I want my mother to allow herself more than one small square of dark chocolate per day. I want women to take pleasure in food, without punishing ourselves for wanting it.
Hear me, womenfolk: I want all of us, everywhere, to stop apologizing, stop rationalizing our behavior, and just eat the damn brownie already.”

Eating: A Manifesto by Krista Burton for Rookie Mag

This is long, but worth the read. The way society as a whole treats women’s hunger is a crime against women.

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Change

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WE CAN NOT BECOME WHAT WE WANT TO BE BY BEING WHAT WE ARE

This quote really shouts out to me. As someone who is frightened by change it’s harder for me to realize if I want to reach my future goals I can’t be the same young women I am today. I can’t be the college girl that goes out every weekend, or the girl who’s always texting her friends. Eventually we are all going to have to separate. We’re all growing up and independence is an amazing yet terrifying thing.
Live better
Do better
Work hard
For they will all pay off in the end.
Embrace your talents and do what makes you happy. But keep in mind, every day and everything you do, molds your future.

Racial Profiling in Law Enforcement

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Racial Profiling in Law Enforcement

         From the moment the states become the United States, the act of racial profiling has been around in America. The actual “principle of targeting individuals based on their race and ethnicity” goes all the way back to slavery (Nation Institute of Justice, 2013). Yet back then, the primary part of the profiling was based on race.  The word “profiling” itself was first used when associating with drug couriers or drug trafficking around the 1970’s. In New Jersey of 1998, the U.S. Department of Justice began to investigate the New Jersey State Police due to suspiciousness of publically racial profiling (Carmen, 2011). That April, “two state troopers fired eleven shots into a van” that held four black men who were on their way to a basketball clinic (Carmen, 2011). After the shooting, the troopers retrieved their police dogs and searched the vehicle and the four men. To the trooper’s surprise, all they found was a bible and some basketball equipment. The media of course immediately took hold of this and other smaller yet similar stories and exploited it. The ACLU works to protect everyone and anyone who they feel have been denied their rights, from lesbians, bisexuals, those of color, those with disabilities and so much more (ACLU, 2005).  Not long after the media and ACLU exploited the issue of racial profiling, the ACLU came out with a publication called “Driving While Black: Racial Profiling on Our Nation’s Highways.” This publication did not only discuss the New Jersey incident but several other cases where they felt racial profiling had taken place (Carmen, 2011). “DMB” then became a popular vernacular from the colored communities. The phrase implies that the motorist may be pulled over simply because he or she is black (Carmen, 2011).  Because this issue went nationwide, by June of 1999, “President Clinton spoke at the Strengthening Police –Community Relations conference in Washington, D.C.” (Racial Profiling Data Collection, n.d.) During this conference “President Clinton directed the Departments of Justice, Treasury, and Agriculture to collect data on race, ethnicity and gender of all individuals subject to stops by federal law enforcement officials” (Carmen, 2011). “In response to allegations of racial profiling, jurisdictions around the country began to track information about those who are stopped, searched, ticketed, and/or arrested by police officers” (Racial Profiling Data Collection, n.d.).  And “more than twenty states have passed legislation prohibiting racial profiling and/or requiring jurisdictions within the state to collect data on law enforcement stops and searches” (Racial Profiling Data Collection, n.d.). There are also hundreds of other jurisdictions in the United States that voluntarily collect data. For example, in South Carolina, Mount Pleasant, Richland County, Spartanburg Public Safety Department and our Highway Patrol voluntarily collect data, effective in January of 2000 (Racial Profiling Data Collection, n.d.). There are only three states that do not collect data at all. Those three states are North Dakota, Mississippi, and Hawaii.

Outside of the UCLA, there is another organization that anyone can be a part of. They call themselves the NAACP. “The mission of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate race-based discrimination” (NAACP, 2009). It is very safe to say that they take Racial Profiling in law enforcement to heart. You also do not have to be African American to be a part of this organization.

It is statistically proven that black males are more likely to be stopped than white males. In response, David Cole, a professor at Georgetown says, “blacks are thirteen times more likely to be sent to state prisons for drug convictions than are whites, so it would seem rational for police to assume that all other things being equal, a black driver is more likely than a white driver to be carrying drugs” (Schmalleger, 2014, p. 188). According to observations by a sociologist named Amitai Etzioni, in 2001 she stated as awful as racial profiling is those who officials who partake in this act are not necessarily racist (Schmalleger, 2014, p. 188). It can be sad to see how people take this issue so lightly. It is even more irritating to see how some believe this is just a way for black males to gain attention. The Hutchinson Report defined Racial Profiling by saying “It is practically an article of faith among you black males that are more likely than whites to be stopped, frisked, spread-eagled, and arrested by the police, often on the flimsiest of charges” (Schmalleger, 2014, p.187). It is understandable that by “creating a profile about the kinds of people who commit certain types of crimes may lead officers to generalize about a particular group and act according to the generalization rather than specific behavior” (National Institute Of Justice, 2012). But when is too far too far? Racial Profiling can become dangerous and cause and many problems. As the ACLU says, “The despicable practice of racial profiling, however, has led countless people to live in fear” providing that this practice can put an emotional toll on those of color (ACLU, 2005). When talking about Racial Profiling, most people think of it as the discrimination towards blacks, but we can’t forget the other races, religions and ethnicities. “Since September 11, 2001, new forms of racial profiling have affected a growing number of people of color in the U.S., including members of Muslim, Arab, and South Asian communities” (ACLU, 2005).

We all know that racism exists and that Racial Profiling in Law Enforcement is real. But this is not an institutional problem but the individual officer’s problem. Racism in itself is a very sticky topic. I can’t say racial profiling in law enforcement will cease completely for the United States have always had this problem. It is more than great that the States have started to do something about this problem, but it is still fairly resent.

References

American Civil Liberties Union and the ACLU Foundation (2005). Racial Profiling.

 Retrieved from https://www.aclu.org/racial-justice/racial-profiling-definition

Carmen, Alejandro del.(2011). Profiling, Racial: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives.

Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/healeyregc6e/study/chapter/encycarticles/ch10/CARMEN~1.PDF

National Association of Colored People. (2009). Mission. Retrieved from

http://www.naacp.org/

National Institute of Justice. (n.d.). Racial Profiling. Retrieved from

http://www.nij.gov/nij/topics/law-enforcement/legitimacy/racial-profiling.htm

Racial Profiling Data Collection Resource Center. (n.d.) Retrieved on November 7, 2013.

Retrieved from http://www.racialprofilinganalysis.neu.edu/index.php

Schmalleger, Frank. (2014). Criminal Justice: A Brief Introduction. (10th ed.) Boston, MA:

Pearson.

Thank you

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I think I changed my mind on copying and pasting everything from my tumblr over. Why look back on all of that? Let’s start new.
I want to take a moment and say I really do have some amazing friends. I could not be more grateful. I may not have 100 close friends, but I have enough to keep me going. They are my backbone and I would not be where I am today with out them.
Friendship is power.
Friendship is love.
Friendship is forever.
I use to be the girl in high school who was friends with everyone. My phone would always blow up with texts. I would always have comments waiting for me on myspace. Ha yeah I said MySpace. But I have grown up a lot since then.
Quality is better than Quantity.
I can proudly say I have 5 non blood related friends I can fully trust with my heart, body and mind.
They are my life.
The best people in my world.
I would do anything for these amazing individuals. Each completely different than the other. And they know that.
That’s friendship.
No matter where you are in life. If you ever have to question your friendships. Take a step back. Friendships are the key to your heart.
Not the perfect job.
Not the perfect boyfriend or girlfriend.
Not the perfect husband or wife.

friendship

Finally !

I’ve finally put up my blog again. But I have a lot to do to make it the way I want to. I’m going to attempt to paste everything I have posted from my tumbler from the past month or so. But we shall see how this turns out. I’m just happy I’m able to create this site and hope that anyone who reads my thoughts enjoy it. I know I will never please everyone. And in saying so at least I’ll some how be entertaining.
Until next time